Hands up if you’ve been in this position before –

You can’t find anything comfy to wear lounging around the house.
Your clothes are all too stiff, glam and uncomfortable just to veg out on the couch.

OR
You can’t find something nice to wear for a night out.
You have no tops or dresses just to thrown on for dinner & drinks.


Annoying, yes! But it happens to the best of us. The good news, is that it’s quite a simple fix.

You see, your wardrobe won’t work if it doesn’t compliment your lifestyle. A wardrobe full of silk shirts & gorgeous skirts won’t work for a busy Mum, just like a wardrobe full of swimmers & sarongs won’t work for someone with a gruelling 9 to 5.

So why do we spend our hard earned cash on clothes that don’t suit our life? Because it’s more fun.
Shopping for trend items or items that are better suited to that “dream life” are simply a lot more fun so we tend to gravitate towards those pieces. Who wants to spend time finding a practical outfit to run errands in?! Having said all of this, how do you work out if your wardrobe stacks up against your lifestyle?

1. Nut It Out 

What do you spend your day doing?  Think about all the different activities you might do in an average month and write these down. Include everything from work to school pick-up to gym, coffee with friends, lazy Sundays on the couch, grocery shopping. Jot it all down, then write beside each one an estimate of how many times you’d do each activity in a month. See below –

Work – 12
Work Event – 2
Exercise – 16
Stay At Home Mum – 18
Grocery Shopping – 4
Date Night – 2
Coffee With Friends – 4
Birthdays – 1
Dinner with Family – 1
Dog Park – 4
Kids Activities – 6

2. Dedicate A Dress Code

Now, you’re going to take your list and make a note beside each activity. You want to work out which activity you’d typically wear a similar outfit and to do this we’ll use dress codes. I like to write down just a few words on the dress code that I’d wear and what that means for me. For example, if I’ve considered an activity to be smart/ casual, then I’d generally wear a similar outfit for each activity under this dress code. See below –

Work – 12 – corporate (blouse, skirt, trousers)
Work Event – 2 – cocktail (dress)
Exercise – 16 – activewear (singlet, leggings, shorts)
Stay At Home Mum – 18 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Grocery Shopping – 4 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Date Night – 2 – cocktail (dress)
Coffee With Friends – 4 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Birthdays – 1 – cocktail (dress)
Dinner with Family – 1 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Dog Park – 4 – lounge (jumper, sweatpants, sneakers)
Kids Activities – 6 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)

3. Do The Maths 

Next, highlight each activity with the same dress code and add up how many times you’d wear each dress code per month. This gives you an idea on the clothes that should take top priority in your wardrobe and where you should be investing your cash. Using my example, I now know that my wardrobe should be mostly made up of smart/ casual clothes, followed by activewear, corporate wear and only a few items suited to cocktail & lounging.

Work – 12 – corporate (blouse, skirt, trousers)
Work Event – 2 – cocktail (dress)
Exercise – 16 – activewear (singlet, leggings, shorts)
Stay At Home Mum – 18 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Grocery Shopping – 4 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Date Night – 2 – cocktail (dress)
Coffee With Friends – 4 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Birthdays – 1 – cocktail (dress)
Dinner with Family – 1 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)
Dog Park – 4 – lounge (jumper, sweatpants, sneakers)
Kids Activities – 6 – smart/ casual (t-shirt, jeans, casual dress)

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